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HARMONY MUSEUM ANTIQUE SHOW & SALE

Categorized as: Art & Galleries
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The Harmony Museum’s annual antique show and sale fundraiser is presented Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 19-20, at the museum’s 1805 Harmony Society-Mennonite Barn annex at 303 Mercer Rd.

Show hours are 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday and 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sunday. Admission is $5 per person; admissions and sales of donated antiques at a museum booth support museum operations. Lunch and refreshments are available.

Selected dealers from three states offer a variety of quality antiques: advertising, country and period furniture, ephemera, folk art, glass, jewelry, lighting, oriental, paintings, pottery, primitives, textiles, tools, toys and smalls. Show chair is Tammy Gallagher of Sanford’s Antiques.

The show takes place at the region’s oldest barn, erected to shelter sheep of the communal Harmony Society of German Lutheran Separatists who founded Harmony in 1804. The town core is a National Historic Landmark. Within nearby walking distance are the Harmony Museum (guided tours in three buildings 1-4 p.m. daily except Mondays and holidays), a museum log house where weaving is demonstrated, as well as specialty shops, a restaurant, a coffee shop and a bakery.

The area’s recorded history began with a Delaware Indian village visited by Virginia Maj. George Washington during his 1753 mission to demand French withdrawal from British territory. The French answered that the British should stay out of New France, resulting in the French and Indian War. Two days after Christmas, the first shot of what became the global Seven Years War was fired at Washington a few miles to the east near today’s Evans City by a French-allied Indian from a northern tribe.

The pacifist Harmony Society from the Stuttgart area, who believed Christ’s return was imminent, came to the wilderness of western Pennsylvania seeking religious freedom, later adopting celibacy. When they moved to Indiana Territory, resettlement was led in 1815 by Mennonites from Lehigh County in eastern Pennsylvania. They built the first Mennonite church west of the Allegheny Mountains, now a museum property, on a hilltop overlooking the Harmonists’ 1805 barn.

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